ICE Won't Look to Deport 21 Savage on Aggravated Felony Charge – XXLMAG.COM

21 Savage
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21 Savage was officially released from ICE custody earlier today (Feb. 13), but his battle to remain in the U.S. isn’t over. There is, however, more good news on that front. Speaking with BuzzFeed News today, Charles Kuck, who acts as an attorney for the U.K.-born Atlanta rapper in his immigration case, said that the Department of Homeland Security is no longer pursuing an aggravated felony charge against the rapper in his immigration case.

If you recall, ICE had originally cited 21’s 2014 drug conviction as grounds to potentially deport the rapper. However, as 21’s lawyers pointed out, the rapper’s conviction was vacated last year. That appears to be the reason for the removal of the aggravated felony charge.

According to Kuck, U.S. attorneys will now be focusing their case entirely on 21’s expired Visa. As claimed in a previous statement from 21’s camp, 21 technically relocated from England to the U.S. when he was seven years old. While ICE originally said he’d only moved to the U.S. in 2005, Savage’s lawyers say the rapper had actually left the country to visit his family in England for a month before returning to Georgia at another point in 2005.

Kuck believes the case of 21’s deportation battle spotlights a macro-level issue in the U.S. abroad. “I think this case is emblematic of a lot of cases where people are detained for not correct reasons, but they don’t always have resources to fight the system,” Kuck said of the rapper, who’d actually applied for a U-Visa in 2017. “This case is very emblematic of what happens in immigration court and detention.”

As we mentioned up top, 21’s battle isn’t over—but at least he’s free now. Speaking to XXL today, Kuck confirmed that the rapper has returned home after being let loose from ICE custody.

SCOOP: DHS attorneys dropped an “aggravated felony” charge against 21 Savage in immigration court yesterday. DHS is only proceeding on his “visa overstay.”

“They had to,” his attorney said. “It didn’t exist,” he said of any felony conviction. “They didn’t do their homework.”

— Hamed Aleaziz (@Haleaziz) February 13, 2019

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